The Best Movie Events In New York This Week #EVENTSNYC #GETURZ

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One-off screenings, festivals, double bills, special guests and more—each week, we bring you the very best of New York’s alternative movie events

the best movie events happening outside New York’s multiplexes, from major international film festivals and revivals at Film Forum and BAM to one-off screenings and in-person Q&As with stars, filmmakers and experts. New York also has a thriving film scene in galleries and pop-up venues, and in the summer months you’ll find a wealth of outdoor screenings in parks and gardens across the city.

 

Every week, we round up the best movie events happening outside New York’s multiplexes, from major international film festivals and revivals at Film Forum and BAM to one-off screenings and in-person Q&As with stars, filmmakers and experts. New York also has a thriving film scene in galleries and pop-up venues, and in the summer months you’ll find a wealth of outdoor screenings in parks and gardens across the city.

1
Paris, Texas + Wim Wenders intro

Paris, Texas + Wim Wenders intro

 

Sam Shepard’s aphoristic dialogue gets sterling support from Robby Müller’s sun-bleached cinematography in Wim Wenders’s atmospheric 1984 tale of a drifter trying to put his family back together. The film features an immortal Ry Cooder score and builds to one of the greatest scenes in all cinema. Wenders will introduce this screening, but if you miss it, MoMA will show the film again on Wed 11.

Museum of Modern Art; Mon 2 at 3:45pm; free–$12.

Read the Time Out review of Paris, Texas

 

2
Boom! + James Grissom intro

Boom! + James Grissom intro

 

Adapted from Tennessee Williams’s play, The Milk Train Doesn’t Stop Here Anymore, Joseph Losey’s 1968 Elizabeth Taylor–Richard Burton vehicle is likely of more interest to gossip hounds than film buffs, though Losey’s robust direction does have its rabid fans. Author James Grissom, whose latest book is called Follies of God: Tennessee Williams and the Women of the Fog, introduces the screening.

Film Forum; Sat at 5:30pm; $7.50–$13.

Read the Time Out review of Boom

 

3
Breathe + Q&A with Mélanie Laurent

Breathe + Q&A with Mélanie Laurent

 

The title offers a valuable reminder of what to do during Mélanie Laurent’s stunning second directorial feature, a knockout thriller about the friendship between two high-school girls. This is a great film that’s still in desperate need of American distribution, so don’t miss your chance to see it while you can. All screenings are followed by a Q&A with Laurent.

Film Society of Lincoln Center; Sat at 3pmBAM; Sat at 6pmIFC Center Sun at 6:45pm.

 

4
Kitty Foyle

Kitty Foyle

 

Ginger Rogers is a small-town gal who moves to big, bad New York City and finds herself faced with a choice: She can commit to a kindly doctor or run away with the married man she’s always loved. Neither fella, however, sweeps her up in his arms as “Cheek to Cheek” plays on the soundtrack in Sam Wood’s underseen 1940 drama.

Museum of Modern Art; Wed–Fri at 1:30pm; free–$12.

 

5
God Told Me To + Q&A with Tony Lo Bianco

God Told Me To + Q&A with Tony Lo Bianco

 

Also known as Demon, Larry Cohen’s bizarre 1976 thriller (actually pretty sane by his standards) finds cop Tony Lo Bianco investigating a series of homicides that appear to have been committed by people possessed by an evil spirit. Or maybe it’s not so evil.…The screening is followed by a Q&A with Lo Bianco and Randy Jurgensen, moderated by Shock Till You Drop’s Sam Zimmerman.

Nitehawk Cinema; Thu at 7:30pm; $15.

Read the Time Out review of God Told Me To

 

6
The Birth of a Nation + Steve Sterner piano accompaniment and intro by Don Perry

The Birth of a Nation + Steve Sterner piano accompaniment and intro by Don Perry

 

You say you want to feel complicated emotions when you go to the movies? Well they don’t get more complicated than in D.W. Griffith’s groundbreaking (and profoundly racist) 1915 masterpiece, an uncomfortably engaging experience that positions the Ku Klux Klan as the heroes. The screening features piano accompaniment by Steve Sterner and an introduction by film producer Don Perry. Tread lightly.

Film Forum; Mon at 7:40pm; $7.50–$13.

Read the Time Out review of The Birth of a Nation

 

7
Playtime

Playtime

 

Short on talk and long on visual gags, Jacques Tati’s monolithic 1967 comedy sees the iconic Mr. Hulot (Tati) wandering through an architecturally sleek Paris, trying to keep an appointment. At once whimsical and foreboding, this is a monumental achievement of French cinema. Few films demand as much to be seen on the big screen.

Museum of the Moving Image; Fri at 7pm; free–$12.

Read the Time Out review of Playtime

 

9
Shock Corridor + TBD special guests

Shock Corridor + TBD special guests

 

Nymphos! Samuel Fuller’s most gleefully lurid picture (which is saying a lot) finds a committed journalist going undercover in a mental hospital and gradually succumbing to madness himself. It’s hard to believe this ever got released, but we’re sure glad that it did. The film, shown on 35mm, will be presented by some yet-to-be-announced special guests.

Nitehawk Cinema; Wed 4 at 7:30pm; $15.

Read the Time Out review of Shock Corridor

 

10
Alice in the Cities + Wim Wenders intro

Alice in the Cities + Wim Wenders intro

 

The middle film in Wim Wenders’s “Road” trilogy (following Wrong Move and preceding Kings of the Road) finds alienated wanderer Rüdiger Vogler unexpectedly saddled with a small girl when her mother disappears. Tender and mysterious, it’s a bracing look at America through the eyes of an outsider. Wenders will be there to introduce the film, and to participate in a postscreening discussion.

Museum of Modern Art; Tue 3 at 6:30pm; free–$12.

Read the Time Out review of Alice in the Cities

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